Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (5)

Located on the Swedish coast is beautiful Chalet Lagunen of Hölick Sea Resort surrounded by wide sandy beaches and endless pine forests.

Made totally in wood, the architecture of the chalet was inspired by the former tents in the resort. The roof is a wooden faltak, traditionally found in the Baltic island of Gotland. Both roof and facades give a homogeneous wood appearance to the cabins, almost hiding them in among the surrounding tall pine trees.

The interiors are compactly planned but light and spacious – perfect for an easy Swedish summer lifestyle with families and friends.

Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (1) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (2) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (3) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (4) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (6) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (7) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (8) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (7a) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (9) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (10) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (11) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (12) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (13) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (14) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (15) Chalet Lagunen by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer (14a)

Design process by Mats Edlund & Henrietta Palmer:

In the year of 2005, David Bäckström, the owner of Hölick Sea Resort, contacted me when I was living in Paris. David told me about his ideas of transforming an old traditional camping-site into something more modern and asked weather I was interested in taking this journey.

Previously, I had worked together with Henrietta Palmer, Professor of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm before with exciting results, so it was felt natural for me to invite her to the project. Since we did not live in the same city at the time, we started mailing our thoughts, ideas and sketches. Early on we also visited the site – both of us for the very first time.

The wilderness and beauty of the landscape, including an old fishing village and beautiful sandy beaches reallystruck us, and we understood that we had to be extremely careful placing houses on this site. To put the houseson plinths, above ground, was an early decision as well as banning cars. We also decided to build raised walkwaysto let the blueberry bushes continue to grow as before. Since Hölick already was a functioning camping site,our designs took inspiration from what we saw. Inspired by tents, we designed two different house types plus asmall grocery store. The original plan was to build ten summer-cottages to be rented out on a short-time basis.

It took David about three years to get the building permission. When he finally received it, he had changedhis mind and rather wanted to sell the houses as condominiums that the owners could in their turn sublet throughHölick Sea Resort. This somehow changed the conditions, and we had to re-think the summer cottage idea andinstead turning them into an all-around-the-year functioning summerhouse. However it is interesting to see howmuch of the first design that is still there. One early idea was to make one of the facades “invisible” by lettingit be mirror-clad. Today it is not unusual, but at that time we had not seen it. Three years later we decided todrop that idea and instead work with wood in various dimensions in order to let them blend into the shadows of theforest. The first house type was built in the summer of 2010, and the construction of the second house type startedin January 2012. There will be a total of 23 houses on two different sites concealed from the old camping site,which is still functioning. It really has been an interesting project because of its complexity: traditional vs.modern, wild nature vs. planning, shared space vs. privately owned.

The priorities are comfort – being able to live simply on site with no grand gestures. Further, an easy access tothe outside, creating light and peaceful spaces and making as little imprint as possible on the site, the natural surroundings and the environment in general. In the longterm perspective Hölick aims towards a more ambitious energy plan with a higher degree of self-sufficiency. Sweden has a wonderful law “allemansrätten”, which is theright to public access. That means that anyone is allowed to walk anywhere and camp for a night or tie your boatto a rock over night. You are also allowed to pick flowers, mushrooms and berries anywhere. This is embedded inthe Swedish relationship to nature and how to act in nature. Probably this common notion is reflected in any summerhouse design in Sweden, since it constitutes a fundamental understanding of how to relate to nature.

 

Photos by Jacob Nordström | Form Arkitektur

 

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